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Yarger, H. A. (2018). Investigating longitudinal pathways to dysregulation: The role of anomalous parenting behavior (Publication No. 2130944494) [Doctoral dissertation, University of Delaware]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses.

Manuscript screening details
Screening decision Screening conclusion HomVEE procedures and standards version
Passes screens Eligible for review Version 1
Study design details
Rating Design Attrition Baseline equivalence Compromised randomization Confounding factors Valid, reliable measure(s)
High Randomized controlled trial Low Established on race/ethnicity and SES; outcomes not feasible to assess at baseline None None Not assessed in manuscripts reviewed before 2021
Notes:

This manuscript analyzes findings from the same randomized controlled trial as Bernard et al. (2012). Additional contextual information about the study and to determine attrition is from Bernard et al. (2012) and based on correspondence with the author.

Study characteristics
Study participants Agencies contracted by a mid-Atlantic city’s child welfare agency referred families to the study who were identified as being at risk for child removal and placement into foster care and had substantiated or unsubstantiated reports of maltreatment. Parent-child dyads were randomly assigned to receive ABC-Infant or an alternate home visiting intervention. A total of 109 parent-child dyads were included in the study (52 in the ABC-Infant group and 57 in the comparison group). Children ranged in age from 2 to 21 months. Ninety-six percent of parents in the study were female. The majority (63 percent) of parents identified as African American and 21 percent identified as Hispanic. Household income was less than $10,000 for 66 percent of families.
Setting The study took place in a large mid-Atlantic city.
Intervention services ABC-Infant consisted of 10 weekly hour-long home visits. The sessions focused on five topic areas: providing nurturance, following the child’s lead, refraining from frightening behavior, parents recognizing the effect of their own childhood experiences on their parenting behavior, and learning the importance of touch and children’s emotions. Across all sessions, parent trainers engaged parents in structured activities with their children and then provided feedback on observations of participants’ parenting behavior, both in real-time and by playing back video recordings from the sessions. 
Comparison conditions Comparison families received Developmental Education for Families (DEF) in home visits that were of the same duration (10 hour-long sessions) and frequency (weekly) as ABC-Infant. DEF was designed to enhance cognitive and linguistic development. For this study, the components related to following children’s cues were removed to distinguish it from ABC-Infant.
Subgroups examined This field lists subgroups examined in the manuscript (even if they were not replicated in other samples and not reported on the summary page for this model’s report).
Subgroups are not listed for manuscripts reviewed before 2021.
Staff characteristics and training The staff in both groups were selected based on their experience in working with children and their interpersonal skills.
Funding sources Not reported.
Author affiliation The author’s dissertation advisor is Mary Dozier, who is a developer of the ABC home visiting model.
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed status is not listed for manuscripts reviewed before 2021.
Study Registration:

Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02093052. Study registration was assessed by HomVEE beginning with the 2014 review.

Findings details

Child development and school readiness
Rating Outcome measure Effect Sample Timing of follow-up Sample size Intervention group Comparison group Group difference Effect size Statistical significance Notes
High

Strange Situation Procedure - Disorganized attachment

FavorableUnfavorable or ambiguousNo Effect

ABC-I vs. DEF; Large mid-Atlantic city

7 months post-intervention

109 children Unadjusted proportion = 0.33 Unadjusted proportion = 0.45 Mean difference = -0.12 HomeVEE calculated = -0.31

Not statistically significant, p= 0.17

Positive parenting practices
Rating Outcome measure Effect Sample Timing of follow-up Sample size Intervention group Comparison group Group difference Effect size Statistical significance Notes
High

Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification (AMBIANCE) - Affective communication errors

FavorableUnfavorable or ambiguousNo Effect

ABC-I vs. DEF; Large mid-Atlantic city

7 months post-intervention

109 parents Not reported Not reported Not reported HomeVEE calculated = 0.21

Not statistically significant, p= 0.27

High

Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification (AMBIANCE) - Disrupted parenting

FavorableUnfavorable or ambiguousNo Effect

ABC-I vs. DEF; Large mid-Atlantic city

7 months post-intervention

109 parents Unadjusted proportion = 0.50 Unadjusted proportion = 0.61 Mean difference = -0.11 HomeVEE calculated = -0.27

Not statistically significant, p= 0.23

High

Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification (AMBIANCE) - Fearful/disorientation

FavorableUnfavorable or ambiguousNo Effect

ABC-I vs. DEF; Large mid-Atlantic city

7 months post-intervention

109 parents Not reported Not reported Not reported HomeVEE calculated = 0.14

Not statistically significant, p= 0.46

High

Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification (AMBIANCE) - Intrusive/negativity

FavorableUnfavorable or ambiguousNo Effect

ABC-I vs. DEF; Large mid-Atlantic city

7 months post-intervention

109 parents Not reported Not reported Not reported HomeVEE calculated = 0.09

Not statistically significant, p= 0.64

High

Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification (AMBIANCE) - Parental withdrawal

FavorableUnfavorable or ambiguousNo Effect

ABC-I vs. DEF; Large mid-Atlantic city

7 months post-intervention

109 parents Unadjusted mean = 3.77 Unadjusted mean = 4.46 Mean difference = -0.69 HomeVEE calculated = -0.44

Statistically significant, p= 0.02

High

Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification (AMBIANCE) - Role/boundary confusion

FavorableUnfavorable or ambiguousNo Effect

ABC-I vs. DEF; Large mid-Atlantic city

7 months post-intervention

109 parents Not reported Not reported Not reported HomeVEE calculated = 0.04

Not statistically significant, p= 0.84

Outcome measure summary

Child development and school readiness
Outcome measure Description of measure Data collection method Properties of measure

Strange Situation Procedure - Disorganized attachment

The Strange Situation procedure involves separating the child from the parent briefly to assess child's attachment to his or her caregiver upon reunification; results in classification of child as secure, avoidant, disorganized, or resistant. This study collapsed the categories into disorganized versus all others.

Videotaped interactions between mother and child.

Interrater agreement on disorganized attachment was 89%.

Positive parenting practices
Outcome measure Description of measure Data collection method Properties of measure

Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification (AMBIANCE) - Affective communication errors

AMBIANCE is a classification system which rates atypical parenting behavior observed in videotaped interactions between mother and child. Parent is categorized as having affective communication errors on a 7-point scale with higher scale rating indicating higher rates of communication errors with child.

Videotaped interactions between mother and child.

Interrater correlation for scale agreement was 79%.

Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification (AMBIANCE) - Disrupted parenting

AMBIANCE is a classification system which rates atypical parenting behavior observed in videotaped interactions between mother and child. Parent is categorized as disrupted or not disrupted in parenting style.

Videotaped interactions between mother and child.

Interrater agreement on disrupted parenting style was 87%.

Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification (AMBIANCE) - Fearful/disorientation

AMBIANCE is a classification system which rates atypical parenting behavior observed in videotaped interactions between mother and child. Parent is categorized as having fear/disorientation (e.g., appearing frightened or disoriented) on a 7-point scale with higher scale rating indicating higher rates of fear/disorientation.

Videotaped interactions between mother and child.

Interrater correlation for scale agreement was 68%.

Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification (AMBIANCE) - Intrusive/negativity

AMBIANCE is a classification system which rates atypical parenting behavior observed in videotaped interactions between mother and child. Parent is categorized as having intrusive/negative behavior on a 7-point scale with higher scale rating indicating higher rates of intrusive/negative behavior.

Videotaped interactions between mother and child.

Interrater correlation for scale agreement was 85%.

Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification (AMBIANCE) - Parental withdrawal

AMBIANCE is a classification system which rates atypical parenting behavior observed in videotaped interactions between mother and child. Parent is categorized as withdrawn parenting style on a 7-point scale with higher scale rating indicating higher withdrawal.

Videotaped interactions between mother and child.

Interrater correlation for scale agreement was 74%.

Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification (AMBIANCE) - Role/boundary confusion

AMBIANCE is a classification system which rates atypical parenting behavior observed in videotaped interactions between mother and child. Parent is categorized as having role/boundary confusion on a 7-point scale with higher scale rating indicating higher rates of role/boundary confusion.

Videotaped interactions between mother and child.

Interrater correlation for scale agreement was 73%.