Promoting Parental Skills and Enhancing Attachment in Early Childhood (CAPEDP) Trial

Implementation support is not currently available for the model as reviewed.

Last updated: May 2019

Effects Shown in Research & Outcome Measure Details

Summary of Findings

Please read Describing Effects for more information on these categories. Only results from studies that meet the standards for the high or moderate ratings are included above.

 

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Maternal Health

Outcomes Rated Moderate

Promoting Parental Skills and Enhancing Attachment in Early Childhood (CAPEDP) Trial
Show Findings Details
Outcome Measure Effect Follow-up Timing Sample Sample Size Intervention Group Comparison Group Group Difference Effect Size Statistical Significance Outcome Type Notes
Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS)
FavorableUnfavorable or ambiguousNo Effect
3 months postpartum CAPEDP vs. usual care, Paris 367 mothers Unadjusted mean = 8.60 Unadjusted mean = 9.40 MD = -0.80 HomeVEE calculated = -0.15 Not statistically significant, p = 0.33 Secondary

Authors estimated the p-value using linear regression and adjusting for baseline Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale scores.

Show Outcome Measure Summary
Outcome Measure Outcome Measure Description Collection Method Properties Outcome Type Operations links
Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS)

The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is a maternal postnatal depression screening tool.

Mother self-report

The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was validated in the French population. Scores greater than 10 were found to be indicative of depressive symptoms. Secondary
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Model Overview

Theoretical Model

In response to an increased number of children living in disadvantaged environments being referred for mental health care, CAPEDP was developed to promote infant mental health and reduce the incidence of infant mental health problems. CAPEDP drew on the framework from the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) model and Integrated Services for Perinatal Health and Early Childhood, a Canadian adaptation of the NFP. The model was based on Bandura’s self-efficacy theory, Bronfenbrenner’s ecological model of human development, and Bowlby’s attachment theory. CAPEDP was implemented within and designed to supplement the French system of free public mother-child support and prevention services. View Revisions

Model Components

Psychologists provided home visits that focused on four themes: (1) the family and its social and cultural network, (2) the mother’s needs and health, (3) creating a safe and stimulating environment for the baby, and (4) the baby’s development. The specific content of the visits varied over the course of the intervention period (with different content offered in the prenatal, 0 to 6 months, 6 to 15 months, and 15 to 24 months periods). Home visitors tailored the visits to the varying needs of each family.

The home visitor recorded a video of the mother and child interacting during daily routines, such as bath and meal time. During the following visit, the home visitor and mother discussed the video together and the home visitor helped the mother reflect on her parenting practices.

To guide the visits, the home visitors used (1) a series of six DVDs on topics such as pregnancy, child care, and child development; and (2) brochures covering a variety of health and mental health topics. View Revisions

Target Population

The target population included mothers who were younger than 26 years old, were less than 27 weeks pregnant, and spoke French fluently enough to actively participate in CAPEDP. Eligible participants also had to meet one or more of the following risk factors: had less than 12 years of education, qualified for free health care based on low-income status, or intended to raise the child in the absence of the father. View Revisions

Where to Find Out More

Antoine Guédeney
Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Hôpital Bichat Claude Bernard124 blv NEY
Paris, France 75018
Email: antoine.guedeney@bch.aphp.fr

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In Brief

Evidence of Model Effectiveness

This model does not meet the criteria established by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for an “evidence-based early childhood home visiting service delivery model” for the general population or for tribal populations because the findings from high- or moderate-rated effectiveness studies of the model do not meet all required criteria.

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Model Description

The Parental Skills and Attachment in Early Childhood: Reduction of Risks Linked to Mental Health Problems and Promotion of Resilience Project (CAPEDP) was a demonstration project in France, implemented from 2006 to 2011. CAPEDP enrolled pregnant women who were younger than 26 years old and had one or more of the following risk factors: had less than 12 years of education, qualified for free health care based on low-income status, or intended to raise the child in the absence of the father. The model was designed to promote infant mental health by addressing postnatal maternal depression, improving parenting skills, and promoting healthy mother-child attachment. Psychologists provided home visits that were guided by a series of six DVDs, brochures covering a variety of health and mental health topics, and video recordings of the mother-child interactions. CAPEDP offered families 44 home visits from the third trimester of the mother’s pregnancy to the child’s second birthday. For more information, please read the Model Overview.

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Extent of Evidence

Results of Research and Review
Number of studies
Eligible for review
3
Rated high
0
Rated moderate
1
Rated low
2
Additional source1

For more information, see the study database. For more information on the criteria used to determine the study ratings, please read Producing Study Ratings.

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Summary of Findings

Please read Describing Effects for more information on these categories. Only results from studies that meet the standards for the high or moderate ratings are included above.

 

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Criteria Established by the Department of Health and Human Services

Information Based on Comprehensive Review of All High- and Moderate-Impact Studies for this Model
High- or moderate-quality impact study?
Yes
Across high- or moderate-quality studies, favorable impacts in at least two outcome domains within one sample OR the same domain for at least two non-overlapping samples?
NA
Favorable impacts on full sample?
No
Any favorable impacts on outcome measures sustained at least 12 months after model enrollment?1
NA
One or more favorable, statistically significant impact reported in a peer-reviewed journal?1
No

Please read the HHS Criteria for Evidence-Based Models for more information.

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