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Family Check-Up® For Children

Meets DHHS criteria for an evidenced based model

Last Updated: July 2011

Effects Shown in Research & Outcome Measure Details for Positive Parenting Practices Outcomes

Impact Studies Rated High


Dishion, T. J., Shaw, D., Connell, A., Gardner, F., Weaver, C., & Wilson, M. (2008). The family check-up with high-risk indigent families: Preventing problem behavior by increasing parents’ positive behavior support in early childhood. Child Development, 79(5), 1395–1414.
Additional Source:

Gardner, F., Connell, A., Trentacosta, C. J., Shaw, D. S., Dishion, T. J., & Wilson, M. N. (2009). Moderators of outcome in a brief family-centered intervention for preventing early problem behavior. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 77(3), 543–553.

Show Study Effects Details
Outcome Effect Sample Timing of Follow-Up Sample Size Program Group Comparison Group Mean Difference or Odds Ratio
Statistical Significance
Effect Size
Outcome Type
Parents Positive Behavior Support Favorable Early Steps Multisite Study sample Age 3 662 families Not available Not available Study- estimated program effect = 0.18 Statistically significant,
p < 0.05
1
Study- reported = 0.33 Primary

1 Statistical significance is based on the results of the authors’ analysis using latent growth models.

Show Study Outcome Measure Summary
Outcome Description of Measure Data Collection Method Properties of the Outcome Measure Outcome Type
Parents Positive Behavior Support The research team coded videotapes and rated each parent on his or her tendency to anticipate potential problems and to provide prompts or other structural changes to avoid young children becoming upset and/or involved in problem behavior. During a 2.5 hour home visit at age 2, 3, and 4, each child and a caregiver were videotaped engaging in a series of tasks that included free play, cleanup, delay of gratification, teaching, presentation of inhibition-inducing toys, and meal preparation. Cronbach’s α = 0.84 Primary

Shaw, D. S., Dishion, T. J., Supplee, L., Gardner, F., & Arnds, K. (2006). Randomized trial of a family-centered approach to the prevention of early conduct problems: 2-year effects of the family check-up in early childhood. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 74(1), 1–9.
Show Study Effects Details
Outcome Effect Sample Timing of Follow-Up Sample Size Program Group Comparison Group Mean Difference or Odds Ratio
Statistical Significance
Effect Size
Outcome Type
HOME Involvement Favorable Pittsburgh sample Age 3 and Age 4 92 boys’ families Mean at age 3 = 2.00 (SD = 1.06),  Mean at age 4 = 2.05 (SD = 1.10)   Mean at age 3 = 1.72 (SD = 1.03), Mean at age 4 = 1.49 (SD = 1.16 ) Difference in growth rates = 0.82 Statistically significant,
p < 0.05
1
HomVEE effect size at age 3 = 0.27, at age 4 = 0.49 Primary

1 Statistical significance is based on the authors’ analysis using a two-way repeated measures analysis of covariance. Authors report using a one-tailed test.

Show Study Outcome Measure Summary
Outcome Description of Measure Data Collection Method Properties of the Outcome Measure Outcome Type
HOME: Involvement scale The HOME assesses parenting practices and aspects of the home environment. Three items were drawn from the HOME, Involvement scale: (1) parent keeps child in visual range, (2) parent talks to child while doing housework, and (3) parent structures child’s play. Observation by a trained examiner during a home visit Cronbach’s α = 0.53 at age 2, Cronbach’s α = 0.56 at age 3 , Cronbach’s α = 0.68 at age 4 Primary
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